Glorifying Christ through Art Class

Now in its eighth year, the annual Maranatha Spring Art Show highlights and celebrates our students’ hard work. Faith is woven throughout every aspect of Maranatha, and the art program is no exception.

“My favorite part of my job is seeing students grow artistically,” says Danielle Williams, Maranatha art teacher. She began her career teaching students animation and animation software programming on the East Coast. Mrs. Williams has also taught at the Kansas City Art Institute, instructing students in drawing, painting, graphics, sculpture and more.

Students often come into the art classroom not considering themselves artists, Mrs. Williams says. “Students have the attitude that they’re not artistic — but they’re comparing their work to Rembrandt and Da Vinci,” she shares. “Every artist finds their own place and develops in that place. At the end of the year, we look at their work from the beginning and see the difference. Students really become encouraged and excited to learn.”

Maranatha Art Show

The Maranatha art curriculum complements much of what students learn in their other courses, even History and Math. “Art supplements what they’re learning in their core classes. I teach students that art is involved in everything. They may be studying anatomy in Science, for example. Through figurative drawing in art, they’re also learning about the human body, about proportions and limbs.

Faith is at the heart of every lesson Mrs. Williams teaches, she explains. “I tell my students that God is the supreme artist,” she says. “God has granted us this gift of creation, and through art, we get to see how diverse God’s creativity is. Every aspect of our world is characteristic of our creator.”

Child at Art Show

This theme extends to the annual Art Show, held this spring at Country Club Bank’s Shawnee branch. “The bank is generous to let us install student art all over the bank,” Mrs. Williams explains. “Because the art is up for a whole week, customers can see and enjoy it. It’s a great way for the community to see what we’re doing in the visual arts department at Maranatha.” During a past art show, the bank president even purchased a student’s watercolor as a gift for his daughter.

Furthermore, the show is an opportunity for parents to engage with their child’s creations. “Sometimes students think their parents won’t care about their art or won’t like it. But parents are often blown away by their student’s ability! It’s a great way for parents to see what we’re doing and how their child is succeeding.”

The show, which took place the last week of March, featured a wide variety of projects. Mediums included ceramics, drawings, paintings, folk art, mixed media and even book binding. The week culminated in a special Spring Art Reception, with student musicians also present and performing solos. “The Art Show gives others the ability to see student work. We’re often our own worst critics, but others are able to see the beauty in the work.”  

Soloist at Art Show

“I tell my students to remember that everything we do, we do to God’s glory,” Mrs. Williams continues. “As 1 Corinthians 10:31 says, we’re called to glorify God in what we do, and we should be grateful that we’ve been given the ability and the gift to create art.”

The Hike | Student News – Spring Edition

Take a look at our student publication, The Hike Spring Edition

Practicing Christ-like Love: Spring Break Mission Trip

The thread of faith is woven throughout everything we do at Maranatha, Spring Break included. More than 30 high school students, led by MCA Bible teacher and basketball coach Travis Thompson, headed to Texas for the annual Spring Break Mission Trip. “We are called to make disciples of all nations,” Mr. Thompson says, “and we carried that mission statement with us as we served.” (BE great and serve!)

Mr. Thompson grew up in Texas, and utilized his background to develop the robust mission trip itinerary. The students ate meals and stayed overnight at Sky Ranch, a Christian summer camp in Van, Texas. They spent their days serving in the cities of Longview and Tyler, primarily in partnership with homeless ministries.

The entire trip was active service, Mr. Thompson explains. “We were up early and stayed up late serving,” he says. “To me, it was an eye-opening experience for our students. We were constantly depending on God’s grace to serve well.” The students even broke a record for their service. While they served at a food bank, they broke the record for how quickly they assembled box lunches.

A significant aspect of the trip is removing students from their typical, comfortable surroundings, Mr. Thompson says. Showing students a reality starkly different from their own — homelessness — was cause for reflection. “We have so many blessings at Maranatha and in our community. Students got to see that whether you’re rich or poor, hungry or fed, God allows us to be content in all things. Students got to see how even though they didn’t have much, the faith of the people we served carried them through.”

The students participated in a number of activities outside of service too, including visits to the JFK Museum and Holocaust Museum in Dallas. The week wrapped up with an evening campfire, where students shared reflections on their service time.

“We may have ‘Christian’ in the name of our school, but my question is always this: how do we represent the name of Christ as we go to serve?” Mr. Thompson says. “Paul reminds us in 2 Corinthians that we are all in ministry. We don’t have to be pastors or missionaries in Africa to practice ministry. We’re called to serve others, and called to show Christ everywhere we go. That’s a representation of what we learn in MCA classrooms and in our churches.”

Mr. Thompson affirms the students for selflessly giving up their breaks in pursuit of serving others. “These kids chose to give up their week of rest to sleep in an unknown place, eat unknown food and serve unknown people,” he says, “And in all of that, we see them thrive!”

“These students got in the trenches with the homeless people we served and were living out the Gospel every day,” Mr. Thompson continues. “I don’t know that I can put into words what these kids have done. They made a lifetime impact on these homeless people. I can assure you that the Christ-like love they showed for these people made an everlasting impact.”

Ultimately, it’s that Christ-like love that defined the mission trip — and defines Maranatha. “As a Bible teacher, it’s awesome to see our kids not only reading the Word, but living it out,” Mr. Thompson says. “We’re all striving to love Jesus more every day, and to take as many people with us to Heaven by loving those around us and sharing in the Gospel (The good news of Jesus).”